Bill Text: IL SB1116 | 2019-2020 | 101st General Assembly | Chaptered


Bill Title: Amends the Juvenile Court Act of 1987. Provides that a minor is subject to the Act if the court has made a finding of probable cause to believe that the minor is abused, neglected, or dependent under the Act prior to the minor's 18th birthday (rather than any minor under 18 years of age). Makes conforming changes. Effective immediately.

Spectrum: Moderate Partisan Bill (Democrat 5-1)

Status: (Passed) 2019-07-12 - Public Act . . . . . . . . . 101-0079 [SB1116 Detail]

Download: Illinois-2019-SB1116-Chaptered.html



Public Act 101-0079
SB1116 EnrolledLRB101 08503 SLF 53580 b
AN ACT concerning minors.
Be it enacted by the People of the State of Illinois,
represented in the General Assembly:
Section 5. The Children and Family Services Act is amended
by changing Section 5 as follows:
(20 ILCS 505/5) (from Ch. 23, par. 5005)
Sec. 5. Direct child welfare services; Department of
Children and Family Services. To provide direct child welfare
services when not available through other public or private
child care or program facilities.
(a) For purposes of this Section:
(1) "Children" means persons found within the State who
are under the age of 18 years. The term also includes
persons under age 21 who:
(A) were committed to the Department pursuant to
the Juvenile Court Act or the Juvenile Court Act of
1987, as amended, prior to the age of 18 and who
continue under the jurisdiction of the court; or
(B) were accepted for care, service and training by
the Department prior to the age of 18 and whose best
interest in the discretion of the Department would be
served by continuing that care, service and training
because of severe emotional disturbances, physical
disability, social adjustment or any combination
thereof, or because of the need to complete an
educational or vocational training program.
(2) "Homeless youth" means persons found within the
State who are under the age of 19, are not in a safe and
stable living situation and cannot be reunited with their
families.
(3) "Child welfare services" means public social
services which are directed toward the accomplishment of
the following purposes:
(A) protecting and promoting the health, safety
and welfare of children, including homeless, dependent
or neglected children;
(B) remedying, or assisting in the solution of
problems which may result in, the neglect, abuse,
exploitation or delinquency of children;
(C) preventing the unnecessary separation of
children from their families by identifying family
problems, assisting families in resolving their
problems, and preventing the breakup of the family
where the prevention of child removal is desirable and
possible when the child can be cared for at home
without endangering the child's health and safety;
(D) restoring to their families children who have
been removed, by the provision of services to the child
and the families when the child can be cared for at
home without endangering the child's health and
safety;
(E) placing children in suitable adoptive homes,
in cases where restoration to the biological family is
not safe, possible or appropriate;
(F) assuring safe and adequate care of children
away from their homes, in cases where the child cannot
be returned home or cannot be placed for adoption. At
the time of placement, the Department shall consider
concurrent planning, as described in subsection (l-1)
of this Section so that permanency may occur at the
earliest opportunity. Consideration should be given so
that if reunification fails or is delayed, the
placement made is the best available placement to
provide permanency for the child;
(G) (blank);
(H) (blank); and
(I) placing and maintaining children in facilities
that provide separate living quarters for children
under the age of 18 and for children 18 years of age
and older, unless a child 18 years of age is in the
last year of high school education or vocational
training, in an approved individual or group treatment
program, in a licensed shelter facility, or secure
child care facility. The Department is not required to
place or maintain children:
(i) who are in a foster home, or
(ii) who are persons with a developmental
disability, as defined in the Mental Health and
Developmental Disabilities Code, or
(iii) who are female children who are
pregnant, pregnant and parenting or parenting, or
(iv) who are siblings, in facilities that
provide separate living quarters for children 18
years of age and older and for children under 18
years of age.
(b) Nothing in this Section shall be construed to authorize
the expenditure of public funds for the purpose of performing
abortions.
(c) The Department shall establish and maintain
tax-supported child welfare services and extend and seek to
improve voluntary services throughout the State, to the end
that services and care shall be available on an equal basis
throughout the State to children requiring such services.
(d) The Director may authorize advance disbursements for
any new program initiative to any agency contracting with the
Department. As a prerequisite for an advance disbursement, the
contractor must post a surety bond in the amount of the advance
disbursement and have a purchase of service contract approved
by the Department. The Department may pay up to 2 months
operational expenses in advance. The amount of the advance
disbursement shall be prorated over the life of the contract or
the remaining months of the fiscal year, whichever is less, and
the installment amount shall then be deducted from future
bills. Advance disbursement authorizations for new initiatives
shall not be made to any agency after that agency has operated
during 2 consecutive fiscal years. The requirements of this
Section concerning advance disbursements shall not apply with
respect to the following: payments to local public agencies for
child day care services as authorized by Section 5a of this
Act; and youth service programs receiving grant funds under
Section 17a-4.
(e) (Blank).
(f) (Blank).
(g) The Department shall establish rules and regulations
concerning its operation of programs designed to meet the goals
of child safety and protection, family preservation, family
reunification, and adoption, including but not limited to:
(1) adoption;
(2) foster care;
(3) family counseling;
(4) protective services;
(5) (blank);
(6) homemaker service;
(7) return of runaway children;
(8) (blank);
(9) placement under Section 5-7 of the Juvenile Court
Act or Section 2-27, 3-28, 4-25, or 5-740 of the Juvenile
Court Act of 1987 in accordance with the federal Adoption
Assistance and Child Welfare Act of 1980; and
(10) interstate services.
Rules and regulations established by the Department shall
include provisions for training Department staff and the staff
of Department grantees, through contracts with other agencies
or resources, in screening techniques to identify substance use
disorders, as defined in the Substance Use Disorder Act,
approved by the Department of Human Services, as a successor to
the Department of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse, for the
purpose of identifying children and adults who should be
referred for an assessment at an organization appropriately
licensed by the Department of Human Services for substance use
disorder treatment.
(h) If the Department finds that there is no appropriate
program or facility within or available to the Department for a
youth in care and that no licensed private facility has an
adequate and appropriate program or none agrees to accept the
youth in care, the Department shall create an appropriate
individualized, program-oriented plan for such youth in care.
The plan may be developed within the Department or through
purchase of services by the Department to the extent that it is
within its statutory authority to do.
(i) Service programs shall be available throughout the
State and shall include but not be limited to the following
services:
(1) case management;
(2) homemakers;
(3) counseling;
(4) parent education;
(5) day care; and
(6) emergency assistance and advocacy.
In addition, the following services may be made available
to assess and meet the needs of children and families:
(1) comprehensive family-based services;
(2) assessments;
(3) respite care; and
(4) in-home health services.
The Department shall provide transportation for any of the
services it makes available to children or families or for
which it refers children or families.
(j) The Department may provide categories of financial
assistance and education assistance grants, and shall
establish rules and regulations concerning the assistance and
grants, to persons who adopt children with physical or mental
disabilities, children who are older, or other hard-to-place
children who (i) immediately prior to their adoption were youth
in care or (ii) were determined eligible for financial
assistance with respect to a prior adoption and who become
available for adoption because the prior adoption has been
dissolved and the parental rights of the adoptive parents have
been terminated or because the child's adoptive parents have
died. The Department may continue to provide financial
assistance and education assistance grants for a child who was
determined eligible for financial assistance under this
subsection (j) in the interim period beginning when the child's
adoptive parents died and ending with the finalization of the
new adoption of the child by another adoptive parent or
parents. The Department may also provide categories of
financial assistance and education assistance grants, and
shall establish rules and regulations for the assistance and
grants, to persons appointed guardian of the person under
Section 5-7 of the Juvenile Court Act or Section 2-27, 3-28,
4-25, or 5-740 of the Juvenile Court Act of 1987 for children
who were youth in care for 12 months immediately prior to the
appointment of the guardian.
The amount of assistance may vary, depending upon the needs
of the child and the adoptive parents, as set forth in the
annual assistance agreement. Special purpose grants are
allowed where the child requires special service but such costs
may not exceed the amounts which similar services would cost
the Department if it were to provide or secure them as guardian
of the child.
Any financial assistance provided under this subsection is
inalienable by assignment, sale, execution, attachment,
garnishment, or any other remedy for recovery or collection of
a judgment or debt.
(j-5) The Department shall not deny or delay the placement
of a child for adoption if an approved family is available
either outside of the Department region handling the case, or
outside of the State of Illinois.
(k) The Department shall accept for care and training any
child who has been adjudicated neglected or abused, or
dependent committed to it pursuant to the Juvenile Court Act or
the Juvenile Court Act of 1987.
(l) The Department shall offer family preservation
services, as defined in Section 8.2 of the Abused and Neglected
Child Reporting Act, to help families, including adoptive and
extended families. Family preservation services shall be
offered (i) to prevent the placement of children in substitute
care when the children can be cared for at home or in the
custody of the person responsible for the children's welfare,
(ii) to reunite children with their families, or (iii) to
maintain an adoptive placement. Family preservation services
shall only be offered when doing so will not endanger the
children's health or safety. With respect to children who are
in substitute care pursuant to the Juvenile Court Act of 1987,
family preservation services shall not be offered if a goal
other than those of subdivisions (A), (B), or (B-1) of
subsection (2) of Section 2-28 of that Act has been set, except
that reunification services may be offered as provided in
paragraph (F) of subsection (2) of Section 2-28 of that Act.
Nothing in this paragraph shall be construed to create a
private right of action or claim on the part of any individual
or child welfare agency, except that when a child is the
subject of an action under Article II of the Juvenile Court Act
of 1987 and the child's service plan calls for services to
facilitate achievement of the permanency goal, the court
hearing the action under Article II of the Juvenile Court Act
of 1987 may order the Department to provide the services set
out in the plan, if those services are not provided with
reasonable promptness and if those services are available.
The Department shall notify the child and his family of the
Department's responsibility to offer and provide family
preservation services as identified in the service plan. The
child and his family shall be eligible for services as soon as
the report is determined to be "indicated". The Department may
offer services to any child or family with respect to whom a
report of suspected child abuse or neglect has been filed,
prior to concluding its investigation under Section 7.12 of the
Abused and Neglected Child Reporting Act. However, the child's
or family's willingness to accept services shall not be
considered in the investigation. The Department may also
provide services to any child or family who is the subject of
any report of suspected child abuse or neglect or may refer
such child or family to services available from other agencies
in the community, even if the report is determined to be
unfounded, if the conditions in the child's or family's home
are reasonably likely to subject the child or family to future
reports of suspected child abuse or neglect. Acceptance of such
services shall be voluntary. The Department may also provide
services to any child or family after completion of a family
assessment, as an alternative to an investigation, as provided
under the "differential response program" provided for in
subsection (a-5) of Section 7.4 of the Abused and Neglected
Child Reporting Act.
The Department may, at its discretion except for those
children also adjudicated neglected or dependent, accept for
care and training any child who has been adjudicated addicted,
as a truant minor in need of supervision or as a minor
requiring authoritative intervention, under the Juvenile Court
Act or the Juvenile Court Act of 1987, but no such child shall
be committed to the Department by any court without the
approval of the Department. On and after January 1, 2015 (the
effective date of Public Act 98-803) and before January 1,
2017, a minor charged with a criminal offense under the
Criminal Code of 1961 or the Criminal Code of 2012 or
adjudicated delinquent shall not be placed in the custody of or
committed to the Department by any court, except (i) a minor
less than 16 years of age committed to the Department under
Section 5-710 of the Juvenile Court Act of 1987, (ii) a minor
for whom an independent basis of abuse, neglect, or dependency
exists, which must be defined by departmental rule, or (iii) a
minor for whom the court has granted a supplemental petition to
reinstate wardship pursuant to subsection (2) of Section 2-33
of the Juvenile Court Act of 1987. On and after January 1,
2017, a minor charged with a criminal offense under the
Criminal Code of 1961 or the Criminal Code of 2012 or
adjudicated delinquent shall not be placed in the custody of or
committed to the Department by any court, except (i) a minor
less than 15 years of age committed to the Department under
Section 5-710 of the Juvenile Court Act of 1987, ii) a minor
for whom an independent basis of abuse, neglect, or dependency
exists, which must be defined by departmental rule, or (iii) a
minor for whom the court has granted a supplemental petition to
reinstate wardship pursuant to subsection (2) of Section 2-33
of the Juvenile Court Act of 1987. An independent basis exists
when the allegations or adjudication of abuse, neglect, or
dependency do not arise from the same facts, incident, or
circumstances which give rise to a charge or adjudication of
delinquency. The Department shall assign a caseworker to attend
any hearing involving a youth in the care and custody of the
Department who is placed on aftercare release, including
hearings involving sanctions for violation of aftercare
release conditions and aftercare release revocation hearings.
As soon as is possible after August 7, 2009 (the effective
date of Public Act 96-134), the Department shall develop and
implement a special program of family preservation services to
support intact, foster, and adoptive families who are
experiencing extreme hardships due to the difficulty and stress
of caring for a child who has been diagnosed with a pervasive
developmental disorder if the Department determines that those
services are necessary to ensure the health and safety of the
child. The Department may offer services to any family whether
or not a report has been filed under the Abused and Neglected
Child Reporting Act. The Department may refer the child or
family to services available from other agencies in the
community if the conditions in the child's or family's home are
reasonably likely to subject the child or family to future
reports of suspected child abuse or neglect. Acceptance of
these services shall be voluntary. The Department shall develop
and implement a public information campaign to alert health and
social service providers and the general public about these
special family preservation services. The nature and scope of
the services offered and the number of families served under
the special program implemented under this paragraph shall be
determined by the level of funding that the Department annually
allocates for this purpose. The term "pervasive developmental
disorder" under this paragraph means a neurological condition,
including but not limited to, Asperger's Syndrome and autism,
as defined in the most recent edition of the Diagnostic and
Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders of the American
Psychiatric Association.
(l-1) The legislature recognizes that the best interests of
the child require that the child be placed in the most
permanent living arrangement as soon as is practically
possible. To achieve this goal, the legislature directs the
Department of Children and Family Services to conduct
concurrent planning so that permanency may occur at the
earliest opportunity. Permanent living arrangements may
include prevention of placement of a child outside the home of
the family when the child can be cared for at home without
endangering the child's health or safety; reunification with
the family, when safe and appropriate, if temporary placement
is necessary; or movement of the child toward the most
permanent living arrangement and permanent legal status.
When determining reasonable efforts to be made with respect
to a child, as described in this subsection, and in making such
reasonable efforts, the child's health and safety shall be the
paramount concern.
When a child is placed in foster care, the Department shall
ensure and document that reasonable efforts were made to
prevent or eliminate the need to remove the child from the
child's home. The Department must make reasonable efforts to
reunify the family when temporary placement of the child occurs
unless otherwise required, pursuant to the Juvenile Court Act
of 1987. At any time after the dispositional hearing where the
Department believes that further reunification services would
be ineffective, it may request a finding from the court that
reasonable efforts are no longer appropriate. The Department is
not required to provide further reunification services after
such a finding.
A decision to place a child in substitute care shall be
made with considerations of the child's health, safety, and
best interests. At the time of placement, consideration should
also be given so that if reunification fails or is delayed, the
placement made is the best available placement to provide
permanency for the child.
The Department shall adopt rules addressing concurrent
planning for reunification and permanency. The Department
shall consider the following factors when determining
appropriateness of concurrent planning:
(1) the likelihood of prompt reunification;
(2) the past history of the family;
(3) the barriers to reunification being addressed by
the family;
(4) the level of cooperation of the family;
(5) the foster parents' willingness to work with the
family to reunite;
(6) the willingness and ability of the foster family to
provide an adoptive home or long-term placement;
(7) the age of the child;
(8) placement of siblings.
(m) The Department may assume temporary custody of any
child if:
(1) it has received a written consent to such temporary
custody signed by the parents of the child or by the parent
having custody of the child if the parents are not living
together or by the guardian or custodian of the child if
the child is not in the custody of either parent, or
(2) the child is found in the State and neither a
parent, guardian nor custodian of the child can be located.
If the child is found in his or her residence without a parent,
guardian, custodian or responsible caretaker, the Department
may, instead of removing the child and assuming temporary
custody, place an authorized representative of the Department
in that residence until such time as a parent, guardian or
custodian enters the home and expresses a willingness and
apparent ability to ensure the child's health and safety and
resume permanent charge of the child, or until a relative
enters the home and is willing and able to ensure the child's
health and safety and assume charge of the child until a
parent, guardian or custodian enters the home and expresses
such willingness and ability to ensure the child's safety and
resume permanent charge. After a caretaker has remained in the
home for a period not to exceed 12 hours, the Department must
follow those procedures outlined in Section 2-9, 3-11, 4-8, or
5-415 of the Juvenile Court Act of 1987.
The Department shall have the authority, responsibilities
and duties that a legal custodian of the child would have
pursuant to subsection (9) of Section 1-3 of the Juvenile Court
Act of 1987. Whenever a child is taken into temporary custody
pursuant to an investigation under the Abused and Neglected
Child Reporting Act, or pursuant to a referral and acceptance
under the Juvenile Court Act of 1987 of a minor in limited
custody, the Department, during the period of temporary custody
and before the child is brought before a judicial officer as
required by Section 2-9, 3-11, 4-8, or 5-415 of the Juvenile
Court Act of 1987, shall have the authority, responsibilities
and duties that a legal custodian of the child would have under
subsection (9) of Section 1-3 of the Juvenile Court Act of
1987.
The Department shall ensure that any child taken into
custody is scheduled for an appointment for a medical
examination.
A parent, guardian or custodian of a child in the temporary
custody of the Department who would have custody of the child
if he were not in the temporary custody of the Department may
deliver to the Department a signed request that the Department
surrender the temporary custody of the child. The Department
may retain temporary custody of the child for 10 days after the
receipt of the request, during which period the Department may
cause to be filed a petition pursuant to the Juvenile Court Act
of 1987. If a petition is so filed, the Department shall retain
temporary custody of the child until the court orders
otherwise. If a petition is not filed within the 10-day period,
the child shall be surrendered to the custody of the requesting
parent, guardian or custodian not later than the expiration of
the 10-day period, at which time the authority and duties of
the Department with respect to the temporary custody of the
child shall terminate.
(m-1) The Department may place children under 18 years of
age in a secure child care facility licensed by the Department
that cares for children who are in need of secure living
arrangements for their health, safety, and well-being after a
determination is made by the facility director and the Director
or the Director's designate prior to admission to the facility
subject to Section 2-27.1 of the Juvenile Court Act of 1987.
This subsection (m-1) does not apply to a child who is subject
to placement in a correctional facility operated pursuant to
Section 3-15-2 of the Unified Code of Corrections, unless the
child is a youth in care who was placed in the care of the
Department before being subject to placement in a correctional
facility and a court of competent jurisdiction has ordered
placement of the child in a secure care facility.
(n) The Department may place children under 18 years of age
in licensed child care facilities when in the opinion of the
Department, appropriate services aimed at family preservation
have been unsuccessful and cannot ensure the child's health and
safety or are unavailable and such placement would be for their
best interest. Payment for board, clothing, care, training and
supervision of any child placed in a licensed child care
facility may be made by the Department, by the parents or
guardians of the estates of those children, or by both the
Department and the parents or guardians, except that no
payments shall be made by the Department for any child placed
in a licensed child care facility for board, clothing, care,
training and supervision of such a child that exceed the
average per capita cost of maintaining and of caring for a
child in institutions for dependent or neglected children
operated by the Department. However, such restriction on
payments does not apply in cases where children require
specialized care and treatment for problems of severe emotional
disturbance, physical disability, social adjustment, or any
combination thereof and suitable facilities for the placement
of such children are not available at payment rates within the
limitations set forth in this Section. All reimbursements for
services delivered shall be absolutely inalienable by
assignment, sale, attachment, garnishment or otherwise.
(n-1) The Department shall provide or authorize child
welfare services, aimed at assisting minors to achieve
sustainable self-sufficiency as independent adults, for any
minor eligible for the reinstatement of wardship pursuant to
subsection (2) of Section 2-33 of the Juvenile Court Act of
1987, whether or not such reinstatement is sought or allowed,
provided that the minor consents to such services and has not
yet attained the age of 21. The Department shall have
responsibility for the development and delivery of services
under this Section. An eligible youth may access services under
this Section through the Department of Children and Family
Services or by referral from the Department of Human Services.
Youth participating in services under this Section shall
cooperate with the assigned case manager in developing an
agreement identifying the services to be provided and how the
youth will increase skills to achieve self-sufficiency. A
homeless shelter is not considered appropriate housing for any
youth receiving child welfare services under this Section. The
Department shall continue child welfare services under this
Section to any eligible minor until the minor becomes 21 years
of age, no longer consents to participate, or achieves
self-sufficiency as identified in the minor's service plan. The
Department of Children and Family Services shall create clear,
readable notice of the rights of former foster youth to child
welfare services under this Section and how such services may
be obtained. The Department of Children and Family Services and
the Department of Human Services shall disseminate this
information statewide. The Department shall adopt regulations
describing services intended to assist minors in achieving
sustainable self-sufficiency as independent adults.
(o) The Department shall establish an administrative
review and appeal process for children and families who request
or receive child welfare services from the Department. Youth in
care who are placed by private child welfare agencies, and
foster families with whom those youth are placed, shall be
afforded the same procedural and appeal rights as children and
families in the case of placement by the Department, including
the right to an initial review of a private agency decision by
that agency. The Department shall ensure that any private child
welfare agency, which accepts youth in care for placement,
affords those rights to children and foster families. The
Department shall accept for administrative review and an appeal
hearing a complaint made by (i) a child or foster family
concerning a decision following an initial review by a private
child welfare agency or (ii) a prospective adoptive parent who
alleges a violation of subsection (j-5) of this Section. An
appeal of a decision concerning a change in the placement of a
child shall be conducted in an expedited manner. A court
determination that a current foster home placement is necessary
and appropriate under Section 2-28 of the Juvenile Court Act of
1987 does not constitute a judicial determination on the merits
of an administrative appeal, filed by a former foster parent,
involving a change of placement decision.
(p) (Blank).
(q) The Department may receive and use, in their entirety,
for the benefit of children any gift, donation or bequest of
money or other property which is received on behalf of such
children, or any financial benefits to which such children are
or may become entitled while under the jurisdiction or care of
the Department.
The Department shall set up and administer no-cost,
interest-bearing accounts in appropriate financial
institutions for children for whom the Department is legally
responsible and who have been determined eligible for Veterans'
Benefits, Social Security benefits, assistance allotments from
the armed forces, court ordered payments, parental voluntary
payments, Supplemental Security Income, Railroad Retirement
payments, Black Lung benefits, or other miscellaneous
payments. Interest earned by each account shall be credited to
the account, unless disbursed in accordance with this
subsection.
In disbursing funds from children's accounts, the
Department shall:
(1) Establish standards in accordance with State and
federal laws for disbursing money from children's
accounts. In all circumstances, the Department's
"Guardianship Administrator" or his or her designee must
approve disbursements from children's accounts. The
Department shall be responsible for keeping complete
records of all disbursements for each account for any
purpose.
(2) Calculate on a monthly basis the amounts paid from
State funds for the child's board and care, medical care
not covered under Medicaid, and social services; and
utilize funds from the child's account, as covered by
regulation, to reimburse those costs. Monthly,
disbursements from all children's accounts, up to 1/12 of
$13,000,000, shall be deposited by the Department into the
General Revenue Fund and the balance over 1/12 of
$13,000,000 into the DCFS Children's Services Fund.
(3) Maintain any balance remaining after reimbursing
for the child's costs of care, as specified in item (2).
The balance shall accumulate in accordance with relevant
State and federal laws and shall be disbursed to the child
or his or her guardian, or to the issuing agency.
(r) The Department shall promulgate regulations
encouraging all adoption agencies to voluntarily forward to the
Department or its agent names and addresses of all persons who
have applied for and have been approved for adoption of a
hard-to-place child or child with a disability and the names of
such children who have not been placed for adoption. A list of
such names and addresses shall be maintained by the Department
or its agent, and coded lists which maintain the
confidentiality of the person seeking to adopt the child and of
the child shall be made available, without charge, to every
adoption agency in the State to assist the agencies in placing
such children for adoption. The Department may delegate to an
agent its duty to maintain and make available such lists. The
Department shall ensure that such agent maintains the
confidentiality of the person seeking to adopt the child and of
the child.
(s) The Department of Children and Family Services may
establish and implement a program to reimburse Department and
private child welfare agency foster parents licensed by the
Department of Children and Family Services for damages
sustained by the foster parents as a result of the malicious or
negligent acts of foster children, as well as providing third
party coverage for such foster parents with regard to actions
of foster children to other individuals. Such coverage will be
secondary to the foster parent liability insurance policy, if
applicable. The program shall be funded through appropriations
from the General Revenue Fund, specifically designated for such
purposes.
(t) The Department shall perform home studies and
investigations and shall exercise supervision over visitation
as ordered by a court pursuant to the Illinois Marriage and
Dissolution of Marriage Act or the Adoption Act only if:
(1) an order entered by an Illinois court specifically
directs the Department to perform such services; and
(2) the court has ordered one or both of the parties to
the proceeding to reimburse the Department for its
reasonable costs for providing such services in accordance
with Department rules, or has determined that neither party
is financially able to pay.
The Department shall provide written notification to the
court of the specific arrangements for supervised visitation
and projected monthly costs within 60 days of the court order.
The Department shall send to the court information related to
the costs incurred except in cases where the court has
determined the parties are financially unable to pay. The court
may order additional periodic reports as appropriate.
(u) In addition to other information that must be provided,
whenever the Department places a child with a prospective
adoptive parent or parents or in a licensed foster home, group
home, child care institution, or in a relative home, the
Department shall provide to the prospective adoptive parent or
parents or other caretaker:
(1) available detailed information concerning the
child's educational and health history, copies of
immunization records (including insurance and medical card
information), a history of the child's previous
placements, if any, and reasons for placement changes
excluding any information that identifies or reveals the
location of any previous caretaker;
(2) a copy of the child's portion of the client service
plan, including any visitation arrangement, and all
amendments or revisions to it as related to the child; and
(3) information containing details of the child's
individualized educational plan when the child is
receiving special education services.
The caretaker shall be informed of any known social or
behavioral information (including, but not limited to,
criminal background, fire setting, perpetuation of sexual
abuse, destructive behavior, and substance abuse) necessary to
care for and safeguard the children to be placed or currently
in the home. The Department may prepare a written summary of
the information required by this paragraph, which may be
provided to the foster or prospective adoptive parent in
advance of a placement. The foster or prospective adoptive
parent may review the supporting documents in the child's file
in the presence of casework staff. In the case of an emergency
placement, casework staff shall at least provide known
information verbally, if necessary, and must subsequently
provide the information in writing as required by this
subsection.
The information described in this subsection shall be
provided in writing. In the case of emergency placements when
time does not allow prior review, preparation, and collection
of written information, the Department shall provide such
information as it becomes available. Within 10 business days
after placement, the Department shall obtain from the
prospective adoptive parent or parents or other caretaker a
signed verification of receipt of the information provided.
Within 10 business days after placement, the Department shall
provide to the child's guardian ad litem a copy of the
information provided to the prospective adoptive parent or
parents or other caretaker. The information provided to the
prospective adoptive parent or parents or other caretaker shall
be reviewed and approved regarding accuracy at the supervisory
level.
(u-5) Effective July 1, 1995, only foster care placements
licensed as foster family homes pursuant to the Child Care Act
of 1969 shall be eligible to receive foster care payments from
the Department. Relative caregivers who, as of July 1, 1995,
were approved pursuant to approved relative placement rules
previously promulgated by the Department at 89 Ill. Adm. Code
335 and had submitted an application for licensure as a foster
family home may continue to receive foster care payments only
until the Department determines that they may be licensed as a
foster family home or that their application for licensure is
denied or until September 30, 1995, whichever occurs first.
(v) The Department shall access criminal history record
information as defined in the Illinois Uniform Conviction
Information Act and information maintained in the adjudicatory
and dispositional record system as defined in Section 2605-355
of the Department of State Police Law (20 ILCS 2605/2605-355)
if the Department determines the information is necessary to
perform its duties under the Abused and Neglected Child
Reporting Act, the Child Care Act of 1969, and the Children and
Family Services Act. The Department shall provide for
interactive computerized communication and processing
equipment that permits direct on-line communication with the
Department of State Police's central criminal history data
repository. The Department shall comply with all certification
requirements and provide certified operators who have been
trained by personnel from the Department of State Police. In
addition, one Office of the Inspector General investigator
shall have training in the use of the criminal history
information access system and have access to the terminal. The
Department of Children and Family Services and its employees
shall abide by rules and regulations established by the
Department of State Police relating to the access and
dissemination of this information.
(v-1) Prior to final approval for placement of a child, the
Department shall conduct a criminal records background check of
the prospective foster or adoptive parent, including
fingerprint-based checks of national crime information
databases. Final approval for placement shall not be granted if
the record check reveals a felony conviction for child abuse or
neglect, for spousal abuse, for a crime against children, or
for a crime involving violence, including rape, sexual assault,
or homicide, but not including other physical assault or
battery, or if there is a felony conviction for physical
assault, battery, or a drug-related offense committed within
the past 5 years.
(v-2) Prior to final approval for placement of a child, the
Department shall check its child abuse and neglect registry for
information concerning prospective foster and adoptive
parents, and any adult living in the home. If any prospective
foster or adoptive parent or other adult living in the home has
resided in another state in the preceding 5 years, the
Department shall request a check of that other state's child
abuse and neglect registry.
(w) Within 120 days of August 20, 1995 (the effective date
of Public Act 89-392), the Department shall prepare and submit
to the Governor and the General Assembly, a written plan for
the development of in-state licensed secure child care
facilities that care for children who are in need of secure
living arrangements for their health, safety, and well-being.
For purposes of this subsection, secure care facility shall
mean a facility that is designed and operated to ensure that
all entrances and exits from the facility, a building or a
distinct part of the building, are under the exclusive control
of the staff of the facility, whether or not the child has the
freedom of movement within the perimeter of the facility,
building, or distinct part of the building. The plan shall
include descriptions of the types of facilities that are needed
in Illinois; the cost of developing these secure care
facilities; the estimated number of placements; the potential
cost savings resulting from the movement of children currently
out-of-state who are projected to be returned to Illinois; the
necessary geographic distribution of these facilities in
Illinois; and a proposed timetable for development of such
facilities.
(x) The Department shall conduct annual credit history
checks to determine the financial history of children placed
under its guardianship pursuant to the Juvenile Court Act of
1987. The Department shall conduct such credit checks starting
when a youth in care turns 12 years old and each year
thereafter for the duration of the guardianship as terminated
pursuant to the Juvenile Court Act of 1987. The Department
shall determine if financial exploitation of the child's
personal information has occurred. If financial exploitation
appears to have taken place or is presently ongoing, the
Department shall notify the proper law enforcement agency, the
proper State's Attorney, or the Attorney General.
(y) Beginning on July 22, 2010 (the effective date of
Public Act 96-1189), a child with a disability who receives
residential and educational services from the Department shall
be eligible to receive transition services in accordance with
Article 14 of the School Code from the age of 14.5 through age
21, inclusive, notwithstanding the child's residential
services arrangement. For purposes of this subsection, "child
with a disability" means a child with a disability as defined
by the federal Individuals with Disabilities Education
Improvement Act of 2004.
(z) The Department shall access criminal history record
information as defined as "background information" in this
subsection and criminal history record information as defined
in the Illinois Uniform Conviction Information Act for each
Department employee or Department applicant. Each Department
employee or Department applicant shall submit his or her
fingerprints to the Department of State Police in the form and
manner prescribed by the Department of State Police. These
fingerprints shall be checked against the fingerprint records
now and hereafter filed in the Department of State Police and
the Federal Bureau of Investigation criminal history records
databases. The Department of State Police shall charge a fee
for conducting the criminal history record check, which shall
be deposited into the State Police Services Fund and shall not
exceed the actual cost of the record check. The Department of
State Police shall furnish, pursuant to positive
identification, all Illinois conviction information to the
Department of Children and Family Services.
For purposes of this subsection:
"Background information" means all of the following:
(i) Upon the request of the Department of Children and
Family Services, conviction information obtained from the
Department of State Police as a result of a
fingerprint-based criminal history records check of the
Illinois criminal history records database and the Federal
Bureau of Investigation criminal history records database
concerning a Department employee or Department applicant.
(ii) Information obtained by the Department of
Children and Family Services after performing a check of
the Department of State Police's Sex Offender Database, as
authorized by Section 120 of the Sex Offender Community
Notification Law, concerning a Department employee or
Department applicant.
(iii) Information obtained by the Department of
Children and Family Services after performing a check of
the Child Abuse and Neglect Tracking System (CANTS)
operated and maintained by the Department.
"Department employee" means a full-time or temporary
employee coded or certified within the State of Illinois
Personnel System.
"Department applicant" means an individual who has
conditional Department full-time or part-time work, a
contractor, an individual used to replace or supplement staff,
an academic intern, a volunteer in Department offices or on
Department contracts, a work-study student, an individual or
entity licensed by the Department, or an unlicensed service
provider who works as a condition of a contract or an agreement
and whose work may bring the unlicensed service provider into
contact with Department clients or client records.
(Source: P.A. 99-143, eff. 7-27-15; 99-933, eff. 1-27-17;
100-159, eff. 8-18-17; 100-522, eff. 9-22-17; 100-759, eff.
1-1-19; 100-863, eff. 8-14-18; 100-978, eff. 8-19-18; revised
10-3-18.)
Section 10. The Juvenile Court Act of 1987 is amended by
changing Sections 2-3, 2-4, 2-23, 2-27, and 5-710 as follows:
(705 ILCS 405/2-3) (from Ch. 37, par. 802-3)
Sec. 2-3. Neglected or abused minor.
(1) Those who are neglected include:
(a) any minor under 18 years of age or a minor 18 years
of age or older for whom the court has made a finding of
probable cause to believe that the minor is abused,
neglected, or dependent under subsection (1) of Section
2-10 prior to the minor's 18th birthday who is not
receiving the proper or necessary support, education as
required by law, or medical or other remedial care
recognized under State law as necessary for a minor's
well-being, or other care necessary for his or her
well-being, including adequate food, clothing and shelter,
or who is abandoned by his or her parent or parents or
other person or persons responsible for the minor's
welfare, except that a minor shall not be considered
neglected for the sole reason that the minor's parent or
parents or other person or persons responsible for the
minor's welfare have left the minor in the care of an adult
relative for any period of time, who the parent or parents
or other person responsible for the minor's welfare know is
both a mentally capable adult relative and physically
capable adult relative, as defined by this Act; or
(b) any minor under 18 years of age or a minor 18 years
of age or older for whom the court has made a finding of
probable cause to believe that the minor is abused,
neglected, or dependent under subsection (1) of Section
2-10 prior to the minor's 18th birthday whose environment
is injurious to his or her welfare; or
(c) any newborn infant whose blood, urine, or meconium
contains any amount of a controlled substance as defined in
subsection (f) of Section 102 of the Illinois Controlled
Substances Act, as now or hereafter amended, or a
metabolite of a controlled substance, with the exception of
controlled substances or metabolites of such substances,
the presence of which in the newborn infant is the result
of medical treatment administered to the mother or the
newborn infant; or
(d) any minor under the age of 14 years whose parent or
other person responsible for the minor's welfare leaves the
minor without supervision for an unreasonable period of
time without regard for the mental or physical health,
safety, or welfare of that minor; or
(e) any minor who has been provided with interim crisis
intervention services under Section 3-5 of this Act and
whose parent, guardian, or custodian refuses to permit the
minor to return home unless the minor is an immediate
physical danger to himself, herself, or others living in
the home.
Whether the minor was left without regard for the mental or
physical health, safety, or welfare of that minor or the period
of time was unreasonable shall be determined by considering the
following factors, including but not limited to:
(1) the age of the minor;
(2) the number of minors left at the location;
(3) special needs of the minor, including whether the
minor is a person with a physical or mental disability, or
otherwise in need of ongoing prescribed medical treatment
such as periodic doses of insulin or other medications;
(4) the duration of time in which the minor was left
without supervision;
(5) the condition and location of the place where the
minor was left without supervision;
(6) the time of day or night when the minor was left
without supervision;
(7) the weather conditions, including whether the
minor was left in a location with adequate protection from
the natural elements such as adequate heat or light;
(8) the location of the parent or guardian at the time
the minor was left without supervision, the physical
distance the minor was from the parent or guardian at the
time the minor was without supervision;
(9) whether the minor's movement was restricted, or the
minor was otherwise locked within a room or other
structure;
(10) whether the minor was given a phone number of a
person or location to call in the event of an emergency and
whether the minor was capable of making an emergency call;
(11) whether there was food and other provision left
for the minor;
(12) whether any of the conduct is attributable to
economic hardship or illness and the parent, guardian or
other person having physical custody or control of the
child made a good faith effort to provide for the health
and safety of the minor;
(13) the age and physical and mental capabilities of
the person or persons who provided supervision for the
minor;
(14) whether the minor was left under the supervision
of another person;
(15) any other factor that would endanger the health
and safety of that particular minor.
A minor shall not be considered neglected for the sole
reason that the minor has been relinquished in accordance with
the Abandoned Newborn Infant Protection Act.
(2) Those who are abused include any minor under 18 years
of age or a minor 18 years of age or older for whom the court
has made a finding of probable cause to believe that the minor
is abused, neglected, or dependent under subsection (1) of
Section 2-10 prior to the minor's 18th birthday whose parent or
immediate family member, or any person responsible for the
minor's welfare, or any person who is in the same family or
household as the minor, or any individual residing in the same
home as the minor, or a paramour of the minor's parent:
(i) inflicts, causes to be inflicted, or allows to be
inflicted upon such minor physical injury, by other than
accidental means, which causes death, disfigurement,
impairment of physical or emotional health, or loss or
impairment of any bodily function;
(ii) creates a substantial risk of physical injury to
such minor by other than accidental means which would be
likely to cause death, disfigurement, impairment of
emotional health, or loss or impairment of any bodily
function;
(iii) commits or allows to be committed any sex offense
against such minor, as such sex offenses are defined in the
Criminal Code of 1961 or the Criminal Code of 2012, or in
the Wrongs to Children Act, and extending those definitions
of sex offenses to include minors under 18 years of age;
(iv) commits or allows to be committed an act or acts
of torture upon such minor;
(v) inflicts excessive corporal punishment;
(vi) commits or allows to be committed the offense of
involuntary servitude, involuntary sexual servitude of a
minor, or trafficking in persons as defined in Section 10-9
of the Criminal Code of 1961 or the Criminal Code of 2012,
upon such minor; or
(vii) allows, encourages or requires a minor to commit
any act of prostitution, as defined in the Criminal Code of
1961 or the Criminal Code of 2012, and extending those
definitions to include minors under 18 years of age.
A minor shall not be considered abused for the sole reason
that the minor has been relinquished in accordance with the
Abandoned Newborn Infant Protection Act.
(3) This Section does not apply to a minor who would be
included herein solely for the purpose of qualifying for
financial assistance for himself, his parents, guardian or
custodian.
(4) The changes made by this amendatory Act of the 101st
General Assembly apply to a case that is pending on or after
the effective date of this amendatory Act of the 101st General
Assembly.
(Source: P.A. 99-143, eff. 7-27-15.)
(705 ILCS 405/2-4) (from Ch. 37, par. 802-4)
Sec. 2-4. Dependent minor.
(1) Those who are dependent include any minor under 18
years of age or a minor 18 years of age or older for whom the
court has made a finding of probable cause to believe that the
minor is abused, neglected, or dependent under subsection (1)
of Section 2-10 prior to the minor's 18th birthday:
(a) who is without a parent, guardian or legal
custodian;
(b) who is without proper care because of the physical
or mental disability of his parent, guardian or custodian;
(c) who is without proper medical or other remedial
care recognized under State law or other care necessary for
his or her well being through no fault, neglect or lack of
concern by his parents, guardian or custodian, provided
that no order may be made terminating parental rights, nor
may a minor be removed from the custody of his or her
parents for longer than 6 months, pursuant to an
adjudication as a dependent minor under this subdivision
(c), unless it is found to be in his or her best interest
by the court or the case automatically closes as provided
under Section 2-31 of this Act; or
(d) who has a parent, guardian or legal custodian who
with good cause wishes to be relieved of all residual
parental rights and responsibilities, guardianship or
custody, and who desires the appointment of a guardian of
the person with power to consent to the adoption of the
minor under Section 2-29.
(2) This Section does not apply to a minor who would be
included herein solely for the purpose of qualifying for
financial assistance for himself, his parent or parents,
guardian or custodian or to a minor solely because his or her
parent or parents or guardian has left the minor for any period
of time in the care of an adult relative, who the parent or
parents or guardian know is both a mentally capable adult
relative and physically capable adult relative, as defined by
this Act.
(3) The changes made by this amendatory Act of the 101st
General Assembly apply to a case that is pending on or after
the effective date of this amendatory Act of the 101st General
Assembly.
(Source: P.A. 96-168, eff. 8-10-09.)
(705 ILCS 405/2-23) (from Ch. 37, par. 802-23)
Sec. 2-23. Kinds of dispositional orders.
(1) The following kinds of orders of disposition may be
made in respect of wards of the court:
(a) A minor under 18 years of age found to be neglected
or abused under Section 2-3 or dependent under Section 2-4
may be (1) continued in the custody of his or her parents,
guardian or legal custodian; (2) placed in accordance with
Section 2-27; (3) restored to the custody of the parent,
parents, guardian, or legal custodian, provided the court
shall order the parent, parents, guardian, or legal
custodian to cooperate with the Department of Children and
Family Services and comply with the terms of an after-care
plan or risk the loss of custody of the child and the
possible termination of their parental rights; or (4)
ordered partially or completely emancipated in accordance
with the provisions of the Emancipation of Minors Act.
However, in any case in which a minor is found by the
court to be neglected or abused under Section 2-3 of this
Act, custody of the minor shall not be restored to any
parent, guardian or legal custodian whose acts or omissions
or both have been identified, pursuant to subsection (1) of
Section 2-21, as forming the basis for the court's finding
of abuse or neglect, until such time as a hearing is held
on the issue of the best interests of the minor and the
fitness of such parent, guardian or legal custodian to care
for the minor without endangering the minor's health or
safety, and the court enters an order that such parent,
guardian or legal custodian is fit to care for the minor.
(b) A minor under 18 years of age found to be dependent
under Section 2-4 may be (1) placed in accordance with
Section 2-27 or (2) ordered partially or completely
emancipated in accordance with the provisions of the
Emancipation of Minors Act.
However, in any case in which a minor is found by the
court to be dependent under Section 2-4 of this Act,
custody of the minor shall not be restored to any parent,
guardian or legal custodian whose acts or omissions or both
have been identified, pursuant to subsection (1) of Section
2-21, as forming the basis for the court's finding of
dependency, until such time as a hearing is held on the
issue of the fitness of such parent, guardian or legal
custodian to care for the minor without endangering the
minor's health or safety, and the court enters an order
that such parent, guardian or legal custodian is fit to
care for the minor.
(b-1) A minor between the ages of 18 and 21 may be
placed pursuant to Section 2-27 of this Act if (1) the
court has granted a supplemental petition to reinstate
wardship of the minor pursuant to subsection (2) of Section
2-33, (2) the court has adjudicated the minor a ward of the
court, permitted the minor to return home under an order of
protection, and subsequently made a finding that it is in
the minor's best interest to vacate the order of protection
and commit the minor to the Department of Children and
Family Services for care and service, or (3) the court
returned the minor to the custody of the respondent under
Section 2-4b of this Act without terminating the
proceedings under Section 2-31 of this Act, and
subsequently made a finding that it is in the minor's best
interest to commit the minor to the Department of Children
and Family Services for care and services.
(c) When the court awards guardianship to the
Department of Children and Family Services, the court shall
order the parents to cooperate with the Department of
Children and Family Services, comply with the terms of the
service plans, and correct the conditions that require the
child to be in care, or risk termination of their parental
rights.
(2) Any order of disposition may provide for protective
supervision under Section 2-24 and may include an order of
protection under Section 2-25.
Unless the order of disposition expressly so provides, it
does not operate to close proceedings on the pending petition,
but is subject to modification, not inconsistent with Section
2-28, until final closing and discharge of the proceedings
under Section 2-31.
(3) The court also shall enter any other orders necessary
to fulfill the service plan, including, but not limited to, (i)
orders requiring parties to cooperate with services, (ii)
restraining orders controlling the conduct of any party likely
to frustrate the achievement of the goal, and (iii) visiting
orders. When the child is placed separately from a sibling, the
court shall review the Sibling Contact Support Plan developed
under subsection (f) of Section 7.4 of the Children and Family
Services Act, if applicable. If the Department has not convened
a meeting to develop a Sibling Contact Support Plan, or if the
court finds that the existing Plan is not in the child's best
interest, the court may enter an order requiring the Department
to develop and implement a Sibling Contact Support Plan under
subsection (f) of Section 7.4 of the Children and Family
Services Act or order mediation. Unless otherwise specifically
authorized by law, the court is not empowered under this
subsection (3) to order specific placements, specific
services, or specific service providers to be included in the
plan. If, after receiving evidence, the court determines that
the services contained in the plan are not reasonably
calculated to facilitate achievement of the permanency goal,
the court shall put in writing the factual basis supporting the
determination and enter specific findings based on the
evidence. The court also shall enter an order for the
Department to develop and implement a new service plan or to
implement changes to the current service plan consistent with
the court's findings. The new service plan shall be filed with
the court and served on all parties within 45 days after the
date of the order. The court shall continue the matter until
the new service plan is filed. Except as authorized by
subsection (3.5) of this Section or authorized by law, the
court is not empowered under this Section to order specific
placements, specific services, or specific service providers
to be included in the service plan.
(3.5) If, after reviewing the evidence, including evidence
from the Department, the court determines that the minor's
current or planned placement is not necessary or appropriate to
facilitate achievement of the permanency goal, the court shall
put in writing the factual basis supporting its determination
and enter specific findings based on the evidence. If the court
finds that the minor's current or planned placement is not
necessary or appropriate, the court may enter an order
directing the Department to implement a recommendation by the
minor's treating clinician or a clinician contracted by the
Department to evaluate the minor or a recommendation made by
the Department. If the Department places a minor in a placement
under an order entered under this subsection (3.5), the
Department has the authority to remove the minor from that
placement when a change in circumstances necessitates the
removal to protect the minor's health, safety, and best
interest. If the Department determines removal is necessary,
the Department shall notify the parties of the planned
placement change in writing no later than 10 days prior to the
implementation of its determination unless remaining in the
placement poses an imminent risk of harm to the minor, in which
case the Department shall notify the parties of the placement
change in writing immediately following the implementation of
its decision. The Department shall notify others of the
decision to change the minor's placement as required by
Department rule.
(4) In addition to any other order of disposition, the
court may order any minor adjudicated neglected with respect to
his or her own injurious behavior to make restitution, in
monetary or non-monetary form, under the terms and conditions
of Section 5-5-6 of the Unified Code of Corrections, except
that the "presentence hearing" referred to therein shall be the
dispositional hearing for purposes of this Section. The parent,
guardian or legal custodian of the minor may pay some or all of
such restitution on the minor's behalf.
(5) Any order for disposition where the minor is committed
or placed in accordance with Section 2-27 shall provide for the
parents or guardian of the estate of such minor to pay to the
legal custodian or guardian of the person of the minor such
sums as are determined by the custodian or guardian of the
person of the minor as necessary for the minor's needs. Such
payments may not exceed the maximum amounts provided for by
Section 9.1 of the Children and Family Services Act.
(6) Whenever the order of disposition requires the minor to
attend school or participate in a program of training, the
truant officer or designated school official shall regularly
report to the court if the minor is a chronic or habitual
truant under Section 26-2a of the School Code.
(7) The court may terminate the parental rights of a parent
at the initial dispositional hearing if all of the conditions
in subsection (5) of Section 2-21 are met.
(Source: P.A. 100-45, eff. 8-11-17; 100-978, eff. 8-19-18.)
(705 ILCS 405/2-27) (from Ch. 37, par. 802-27)
Sec. 2-27. Placement; legal custody or guardianship.
(1) If the court determines and puts in writing the factual
basis supporting the determination of whether the parents,
guardian, or legal custodian of a minor adjudged a ward of the
court are unfit or are unable, for some reason other than
financial circumstances alone, to care for, protect, train or
discipline the minor or are unwilling to do so, and that the
health, safety, and best interest of the minor will be
jeopardized if the minor remains in the custody of his or her
parents, guardian or custodian, the court may at this hearing
and at any later point:
(a) place the minor in the custody of a suitable
relative or other person as legal custodian or guardian;
(a-5) with the approval of the Department of Children
and Family Services, place the minor in the subsidized
guardianship of a suitable relative or other person as
legal guardian; "subsidized guardianship" means a private
guardianship arrangement for children for whom the
permanency goals of return home and adoption have been
ruled out and who meet the qualifications for subsidized
guardianship as defined by the Department of Children and
Family Services in administrative rules;
(b) place the minor under the guardianship of a
probation officer;
(c) commit the minor to an agency for care or
placement, except an institution under the authority of the
Department of Corrections or of the Department of Children
and Family Services;
(d) on and after the effective date of this amendatory
Act of the 98th General Assembly and before January 1,
2017, commit the minor to the Department of Children and
Family Services for care and service; however, a minor
charged with a criminal offense under the Criminal Code of
1961 or the Criminal Code of 2012 or adjudicated delinquent
shall not be placed in the custody of or committed to the
Department of Children and Family Services by any court,
except (i) a minor less than 16 years of age and committed
to the Department of Children and Family Services under
Section 5-710 of this Act, (ii) a minor under the age of 18
for whom an independent basis of abuse, neglect, or
dependency exists, or (iii) a minor for whom the court has
granted a supplemental petition to reinstate wardship
pursuant to subsection (2) of Section 2-33 of this Act. On
and after January 1, 2017, commit the minor to the
Department of Children and Family Services for care and
service; however, a minor charged with a criminal offense
under the Criminal Code of 1961 or the Criminal Code of
2012 or adjudicated delinquent shall not be placed in the
custody of or committed to the Department of Children and
Family Services by any court, except (i) a minor less than
15 years of age and committed to the Department of Children
and Family Services under Section 5-710 of this Act, (ii) a
minor under the age of 18 for whom an independent basis of
abuse, neglect, or dependency exists, or (iii) a minor for
whom the court has granted a supplemental petition to
reinstate wardship pursuant to subsection (2) of Section
2-33 of this Act. An independent basis exists when the
allegations or adjudication of abuse, neglect, or
dependency do not arise from the same facts, incident, or
circumstances which give rise to a charge or adjudication
of delinquency. The Department shall be given due notice of
the pendency of the action and the Guardianship
Administrator of the Department of Children and Family
Services shall be appointed guardian of the person of the
minor. Whenever the Department seeks to discharge a minor
from its care and service, the Guardianship Administrator
shall petition the court for an order terminating
guardianship. The Guardianship Administrator may designate
one or more other officers of the Department, appointed as
Department officers by administrative order of the
Department Director, authorized to affix the signature of
the Guardianship Administrator to documents affecting the
guardian-ward relationship of children for whom he or she
has been appointed guardian at such times as he or she is
unable to perform the duties of his or her office. The
signature authorization shall include but not be limited to
matters of consent of marriage, enlistment in the armed
forces, legal proceedings, adoption, major medical and
surgical treatment and application for driver's license.
Signature authorizations made pursuant to the provisions
of this paragraph shall be filed with the Secretary of
State and the Secretary of State shall provide upon payment
of the customary fee, certified copies of the authorization
to any court or individual who requests a copy.
(1.5) In making a determination under this Section, the
court shall also consider whether, based on health, safety, and
the best interests of the minor,
(a) appropriate services aimed at family preservation
and family reunification have been unsuccessful in
rectifying the conditions that have led to a finding of
unfitness or inability to care for, protect, train, or
discipline the minor, or
(b) no family preservation or family reunification
services would be appropriate,
and if the petition or amended petition contained an allegation
that the parent is an unfit person as defined in subdivision
(D) of Section 1 of the Adoption Act, and the order of
adjudication recites that parental unfitness was established
by clear and convincing evidence, the court shall, when
appropriate and in the best interest of the minor, enter an
order terminating parental rights and appointing a guardian
with power to consent to adoption in accordance with Section
2-29.
When making a placement, the court, wherever possible,
shall require the Department of Children and Family Services to
select a person holding the same religious belief as that of
the minor or a private agency controlled by persons of like
religious faith of the minor and shall require the Department
to otherwise comply with Section 7 of the Children and Family
Services Act in placing the child. In addition, whenever
alternative plans for placement are available, the court shall
ascertain and consider, to the extent appropriate in the
particular case, the views and preferences of the minor.
(2) When a minor is placed with a suitable relative or
other person pursuant to item (a) of subsection (1), the court
shall appoint him or her the legal custodian or guardian of the
person of the minor. When a minor is committed to any agency,
the court shall appoint the proper officer or representative
thereof as legal custodian or guardian of the person of the
minor. Legal custodians and guardians of the person of the
minor have the respective rights and duties set forth in
subsection (9) of Section 1-3 except as otherwise provided by
order of court; but no guardian of the person may consent to
adoption of the minor unless that authority is conferred upon
him or her in accordance with Section 2-29. An agency whose
representative is appointed guardian of the person or legal
custodian of the minor may place the minor in any child care
facility, but the facility must be licensed under the Child
Care Act of 1969 or have been approved by the Department of
Children and Family Services as meeting the standards
established for such licensing. No agency may place a minor
adjudicated under Sections 2-3 or 2-4 in a child care facility
unless the placement is in compliance with the rules and
regulations for placement under this Section promulgated by the
Department of Children and Family Services under Section 5 of
the Children and Family Services Act. Like authority and
restrictions shall be conferred by the court upon any probation
officer who has been appointed guardian of the person of a
minor.
(3) No placement by any probation officer or agency whose
representative is appointed guardian of the person or legal
custodian of a minor may be made in any out of State child care
facility unless it complies with the Interstate Compact on the
Placement of Children. Placement with a parent, however, is not
subject to that Interstate Compact.
(4) The clerk of the court shall issue to the legal
custodian or guardian of the person a certified copy of the
order of court, as proof of his authority. No other process is
necessary as authority for the keeping of the minor.
(5) Custody or guardianship granted under this Section
continues until the court otherwise directs, but not after the
minor reaches the age of 19 years except as set forth in
Section 2-31, or if the minor was previously committed to the
Department of Children and Family Services for care and service
and the court has granted a supplemental petition to reinstate
wardship pursuant to subsection (2) of Section 2-33.
(6) (Blank).
(Source: P.A. 97-1150, eff. 1-25-13; 98-803, eff. 1-1-15.)
(705 ILCS 405/5-710)
Sec. 5-710. Kinds of sentencing orders.
(1) The following kinds of sentencing orders may be made in
respect of wards of the court:
(a) Except as provided in Sections 5-805, 5-810, and
5-815, a minor who is found guilty under Section 5-620 may
be:
(i) put on probation or conditional discharge and
released to his or her parents, guardian or legal
custodian, provided, however, that any such minor who
is not committed to the Department of Juvenile Justice
under this subsection and who is found to be a
delinquent for an offense which is first degree murder,
a Class X felony, or a forcible felony shall be placed
on probation;
(ii) placed in accordance with Section 5-740, with
or without also being put on probation or conditional
discharge;
(iii) required to undergo a substance abuse
assessment conducted by a licensed provider and
participate in the indicated clinical level of care;
(iv) on and after the effective date of this
amendatory Act of the 98th General Assembly and before
January 1, 2017, placed in the guardianship of the
Department of Children and Family Services, but only if
the delinquent minor is under 16 years of age or,
pursuant to Article II of this Act, a minor under the
age of 18 for whom an independent basis of abuse,
neglect, or dependency exists. On and after January 1,
2017, placed in the guardianship of the Department of
Children and Family Services, but only if the
delinquent minor is under 15 years of age or, pursuant
to Article II of this Act, a minor for whom an
independent basis of abuse, neglect, or dependency
exists. An independent basis exists when the
allegations or adjudication of abuse, neglect, or
dependency do not arise from the same facts, incident,
or circumstances which give rise to a charge or
adjudication of delinquency;
(v) placed in detention for a period not to exceed
30 days, either as the exclusive order of disposition
or, where appropriate, in conjunction with any other
order of disposition issued under this paragraph,
provided that any such detention shall be in a juvenile
detention home and the minor so detained shall be 10
years of age or older. However, the 30-day limitation
may be extended by further order of the court for a
minor under age 15 committed to the Department of
Children and Family Services if the court finds that
the minor is a danger to himself or others. The minor
shall be given credit on the sentencing order of
detention for time spent in detention under Sections
5-501, 5-601, 5-710, or 5-720 of this Article as a
result of the offense for which the sentencing order
was imposed. The court may grant credit on a sentencing
order of detention entered under a violation of
probation or violation of conditional discharge under
Section 5-720 of this Article for time spent in
detention before the filing of the petition alleging
the violation. A minor shall not be deprived of credit
for time spent in detention before the filing of a
violation of probation or conditional discharge
alleging the same or related act or acts. The
limitation that the minor shall only be placed in a
juvenile detention home does not apply as follows:
Persons 18 years of age and older who have a
petition of delinquency filed against them may be
confined in an adult detention facility. In making a
determination whether to confine a person 18 years of
age or older who has a petition of delinquency filed
against the person, these factors, among other
matters, shall be considered:
(A) the age of the person;
(B) any previous delinquent or criminal
history of the person;
(C) any previous abuse or neglect history of
the person;
(D) any mental health history of the person;
and
(E) any educational history of the person;
(vi) ordered partially or completely emancipated
in accordance with the provisions of the Emancipation
of Minors Act;
(vii) subject to having his or her driver's license
or driving privileges suspended for such time as
determined by the court but only until he or she
attains 18 years of age;
(viii) put on probation or conditional discharge
and placed in detention under Section 3-6039 of the
Counties Code for a period not to exceed the period of
incarceration permitted by law for adults found guilty
of the same offense or offenses for which the minor was
adjudicated delinquent, and in any event no longer than
upon attainment of age 21; this subdivision (viii)
notwithstanding any contrary provision of the law;
(ix) ordered to undergo a medical or other
procedure to have a tattoo symbolizing allegiance to a
street gang removed from his or her body; or
(x) placed in electronic monitoring or home
detention under Part 7A of this Article.
(b) A minor found to be guilty may be committed to the
Department of Juvenile Justice under Section 5-750 if the
minor is at least 13 years and under 20 years of age,
provided that the commitment to the Department of Juvenile
Justice shall be made only if the minor was found guilty of
a felony offense or first degree murder. The court shall
include in the sentencing order any pre-custody credits the
minor is entitled to under Section 5-4.5-100 of the Unified
Code of Corrections. The time during which a minor is in
custody before being released upon the request of a parent,
guardian or legal custodian shall also be considered as
time spent in custody.
(c) When a minor is found to be guilty for an offense
which is a violation of the Illinois Controlled Substances
Act, the Cannabis Control Act, or the Methamphetamine
Control and Community Protection Act and made a ward of the
court, the court may enter a disposition order requiring
the minor to undergo assessment, counseling or treatment in
a substance use disorder treatment program approved by the
Department of Human Services.
(2) Any sentencing order other than commitment to the
Department of Juvenile Justice may provide for protective
supervision under Section 5-725 and may include an order of
protection under Section 5-730.
(3) Unless the sentencing order expressly so provides, it
does not operate to close proceedings on the pending petition,
but is subject to modification until final closing and
discharge of the proceedings under Section 5-750.
(4) In addition to any other sentence, the court may order
any minor found to be delinquent to make restitution, in
monetary or non-monetary form, under the terms and conditions
of Section 5-5-6 of the Unified Code of Corrections, except
that the "presentencing hearing" referred to in that Section
shall be the sentencing hearing for purposes of this Section.
The parent, guardian or legal custodian of the minor may be
ordered by the court to pay some or all of the restitution on
the minor's behalf, pursuant to the Parental Responsibility
Law. The State's Attorney is authorized to act on behalf of any
victim in seeking restitution in proceedings under this
Section, up to the maximum amount allowed in Section 5 of the
Parental Responsibility Law.
(5) Any sentencing order where the minor is committed or
placed in accordance with Section 5-740 shall provide for the
parents or guardian of the estate of the minor to pay to the
legal custodian or guardian of the person of the minor such
sums as are determined by the custodian or guardian of the
person of the minor as necessary for the minor's needs. The
payments may not exceed the maximum amounts provided for by
Section 9.1 of the Children and Family Services Act.
(6) Whenever the sentencing order requires the minor to
attend school or participate in a program of training, the
truant officer or designated school official shall regularly
report to the court if the minor is a chronic or habitual
truant under Section 26-2a of the School Code. Notwithstanding
any other provision of this Act, in instances in which
educational services are to be provided to a minor in a
residential facility where the minor has been placed by the
court, costs incurred in the provision of those educational
services must be allocated based on the requirements of the
School Code.
(7) In no event shall a guilty minor be committed to the
Department of Juvenile Justice for a period of time in excess
of that period for which an adult could be committed for the
same act. The court shall include in the sentencing order a
limitation on the period of confinement not to exceed the
maximum period of imprisonment the court could impose under
Article V of the Unified Code of Corrections.
(7.5) In no event shall a guilty minor be committed to the
Department of Juvenile Justice or placed in detention when the
act for which the minor was adjudicated delinquent would not be
illegal if committed by an adult.
(7.6) In no event shall a guilty minor be committed to the
Department of Juvenile Justice for an offense which is a Class
4 felony under Section 19-4 (criminal trespass to a residence),
21-1 (criminal damage to property), 21-1.01 (criminal damage to
government supported property), 21-1.3 (criminal defacement of
property), 26-1 (disorderly conduct), or 31-4 (obstructing
justice) of the Criminal Code of 2012.
(7.75) In no event shall a guilty minor be committed to the
Department of Juvenile Justice for an offense that is a Class 3
or Class 4 felony violation of the Illinois Controlled
Substances Act unless the commitment occurs upon a third or
subsequent judicial finding of a violation of probation for
substantial noncompliance with court-ordered treatment or
programming.
(8) A minor found to be guilty for reasons that include a
violation of Section 21-1.3 of the Criminal Code of 1961 or the
Criminal Code of 2012 shall be ordered to perform community
service for not less than 30 and not more than 120 hours, if
community service is available in the jurisdiction. The
community service shall include, but need not be limited to,
the cleanup and repair of the damage that was caused by the
violation or similar damage to property located in the
municipality or county in which the violation occurred. The
order may be in addition to any other order authorized by this
Section.
(8.5) A minor found to be guilty for reasons that include a
violation of Section 3.02 or Section 3.03 of the Humane Care
for Animals Act or paragraph (d) of subsection (1) of Section
21-1 of the Criminal Code of 1961 or paragraph (4) of
subsection (a) of Section 21-1 of the Criminal Code of 2012
shall be ordered to undergo medical or psychiatric treatment
rendered by a psychiatrist or psychological treatment rendered
by a clinical psychologist. The order may be in addition to any
other order authorized by this Section.
(9) In addition to any other sentencing order, the court
shall order any minor found to be guilty for an act which would
constitute, predatory criminal sexual assault of a child,
aggravated criminal sexual assault, criminal sexual assault,
aggravated criminal sexual abuse, or criminal sexual abuse if
committed by an adult to undergo medical testing to determine
whether the defendant has any sexually transmissible disease
including a test for infection with human immunodeficiency
virus (HIV) or any other identified causative agency of
acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Any medical test
shall be performed only by appropriately licensed medical
practitioners and may include an analysis of any bodily fluids
as well as an examination of the minor's person. Except as
otherwise provided by law, the results of the test shall be
kept strictly confidential by all medical personnel involved in
the testing and must be personally delivered in a sealed
envelope to the judge of the court in which the sentencing
order was entered for the judge's inspection in camera. Acting
in accordance with the best interests of the victim and the
public, the judge shall have the discretion to determine to
whom the results of the testing may be revealed. The court
shall notify the minor of the results of the test for infection
with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The court shall
also notify the victim if requested by the victim, and if the
victim is under the age of 15 and if requested by the victim's
parents or legal guardian, the court shall notify the victim's
parents or the legal guardian, of the results of the test for
infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The
court shall provide information on the availability of HIV
testing and counseling at the Department of Public Health
facilities to all parties to whom the results of the testing
are revealed. The court shall order that the cost of any test
shall be paid by the county and may be taxed as costs against
the minor.
(10) When a court finds a minor to be guilty the court
shall, before entering a sentencing order under this Section,
make a finding whether the offense committed either: (a) was
related to or in furtherance of the criminal activities of an
organized gang or was motivated by the minor's membership in or
allegiance to an organized gang, or (b) involved a violation of
subsection (a) of Section 12-7.1 of the Criminal Code of 1961
or the Criminal Code of 2012, a violation of any Section of
Article 24 of the Criminal Code of 1961 or the Criminal Code of
2012, or a violation of any statute that involved the wrongful
use of a firearm. If the court determines the question in the
affirmative, and the court does not commit the minor to the
Department of Juvenile Justice, the court shall order the minor
to perform community service for not less than 30 hours nor
more than 120 hours, provided that community service is
available in the jurisdiction and is funded and approved by the
county board of the county where the offense was committed. The
community service shall include, but need not be limited to,
the cleanup and repair of any damage caused by a violation of
Section 21-1.3 of the Criminal Code of 1961 or the Criminal
Code of 2012 and similar damage to property located in the
municipality or county in which the violation occurred. When
possible and reasonable, the community service shall be
performed in the minor's neighborhood. This order shall be in
addition to any other order authorized by this Section except
for an order to place the minor in the custody of the
Department of Juvenile Justice. For the purposes of this
Section, "organized gang" has the meaning ascribed to it in
Section 10 of the Illinois Streetgang Terrorism Omnibus
Prevention Act.
(11) If the court determines that the offense was committed
in furtherance of the criminal activities of an organized gang,
as provided in subsection (10), and that the offense involved
the operation or use of a motor vehicle or the use of a
driver's license or permit, the court shall notify the
Secretary of State of that determination and of the period for
which the minor shall be denied driving privileges. If, at the
time of the determination, the minor does not hold a driver's
license or permit, the court shall provide that the minor shall
not be issued a driver's license or permit until his or her
18th birthday. If the minor holds a driver's license or permit
at the time of the determination, the court shall provide that
the minor's driver's license or permit shall be revoked until
his or her 21st birthday, or until a later date or occurrence
determined by the court. If the minor holds a driver's license
at the time of the determination, the court may direct the
Secretary of State to issue the minor a judicial driving
permit, also known as a JDP. The JDP shall be subject to the
same terms as a JDP issued under Section 6-206.1 of the
Illinois Vehicle Code, except that the court may direct that
the JDP be effective immediately.
(12) If a minor is found to be guilty of a violation of
subsection (a-7) of Section 1 of the Prevention of Tobacco Use
by Minors Act, the court may, in its discretion, and upon
recommendation by the State's Attorney, order that minor and
his or her parents or legal guardian to attend a smoker's
education or youth diversion program as defined in that Act if
that program is available in the jurisdiction where the
offender resides. Attendance at a smoker's education or youth
diversion program shall be time-credited against any community
service time imposed for any first violation of subsection
(a-7) of Section 1 of that Act. In addition to any other
penalty that the court may impose for a violation of subsection
(a-7) of Section 1 of that Act, the court, upon request by the
State's Attorney, may in its discretion require the offender to
remit a fee for his or her attendance at a smoker's education
or youth diversion program.
For purposes of this Section, "smoker's education program"
or "youth diversion program" includes, but is not limited to, a
seminar designed to educate a person on the physical and
psychological effects of smoking tobacco products and the
health consequences of smoking tobacco products that can be
conducted with a locality's youth diversion program.
In addition to any other penalty that the court may impose
under this subsection (12):
(a) If a minor violates subsection (a-7) of Section 1
of the Prevention of Tobacco Use by Minors Act, the court
may impose a sentence of 15 hours of community service or a
fine of $25 for a first violation.
(b) A second violation by a minor of subsection (a-7)
of Section 1 of that Act that occurs within 12 months after
the first violation is punishable by a fine of $50 and 25
hours of community service.
(c) A third or subsequent violation by a minor of
subsection (a-7) of Section 1 of that Act that occurs
within 12 months after the first violation is punishable by
a $100 fine and 30 hours of community service.
(d) Any second or subsequent violation not within the
12-month time period after the first violation is
punishable as provided for a first violation.
(Source: P.A. 99-268, eff. 1-1-16; 99-628, eff. 1-1-17; 99-879,
eff. 1-1-17; 100-201, eff. 8-18-17; 100-431, eff. 8-25-17;
100-759, eff. 1-1-19.)
Section 99. Effective date. This Act takes effect upon
becoming law.
feedback